Monday, December 28

Key Technique Words for skiers to focus on while skiing!
CLASSIC TECHNIQUE KEY WORDS: 
Diagonal Stride: 1 = touch toque to sky tall body position and look forward with head up and hips forward (not head down and hips back); 2 = twist hips to ssswwwiiinnnggg knee and rotate hips to swing recovery knee forward; 3 = bellybutton follows recovery ski tip forward to keep hips forward during glide; 4 = keep recovery knee bent and point toes down to keep the tip of ski in the track and the tail of ski in the air so the ski doesn't drag forward during recovery; 5 = land your recovery ski forward like an airplane landing (not put it down on in the track behind you); 6 = ssswwwiiinnnggg elbow and rotate shoulder forward; 7 = popcorn snap your kick leg-foot straight down to break the ball of your foot (don't kick back or you will back-slide); 8 = crunch pole and crunch abs to break pole strap; 9 = elbow person behind you to pole back with upper body rotation; 10 = relax muscles like jello during recovery swing.
Double Poling: 1 = drive recovery elbows forward and fall forward from ankles so that your body weight comes up off of heels; 2 = open bellybutton forward; 3 = powerful poling platform with elbows elbows bent at 90 degrees during crunch; 4 = crunch poles down to try to break pole straps by crunching abdominal muscles at the same time as you collapse ankles with knees collapsing toward ski tips; 5 = crunch-curl your upper body like a cat; 6 = keep weight on the balls of your feet during poling effort (don't sit back on toilet); 7 = recover bounce your elbows and body forward.
Herringbone Uphill: 1 = relax and breathe; 2 = use long relaxed zone 3 bound-strides;  3 = keep recovery feet passing close to each other while stepping up the hill (don't stride with your feet way out to the side; 4 = relaxed upper body.
Kick-Pole (one step double pole): 1 = slide your kicking foot forward one boot length to prepare for powerful kick; 2 = bounce collapse your kicking ankle at the same time you ssswwwiiinnnggg your arms forward using your arm swing bounce to add power to your kick; 3 = snap your kick leg-foot straight down to break the ball of your foot (don't kick back or you will back-slide); 4 = drive everything forward together at the same time bellybutton-hip-knee-foot-ski-shoulders-elbows-poles; 5 = fall forward from ankles so that your body weight comes up off of heels; 6 = open bellybutton forward; 7 = powerful poling platform with elbows elbows bent at 90 degrees during crunch; 8 = crunch poles down to try to break pole straps by crunching abdominal muscles at the same time as you collapse ankles with knees collapsing toward ski tips; 9 = crunch-curl your upper body like a cat; 10 = keep weight on the balls of your feet during poling effort (don't sit back on toilet); 11 = recover bounce your elbows and body forward.
Finish each workout with 15 minutes of poling strength training, by alternating techniques between double poling up gentle hills or into the wind; and one arm poling on the flats or with the wind, changing techniques from one arm poling before your arm completely fatigues.
One Arm Poling Key Words: 1 = ski tall to touch head to sky; 2 = rotate-twist shoulders to reach forward with elbows; 3 = open bellybutton forward; 4 = crunch pole with abs to break pole strap; 5 = rotate-twist shoulders to elbow the person behind you; 6 = one arm pole with whole upper body and not just your arms.

SKATE TECHNIQUE KEY WORDS: 
Two Skate Technique Key Words: RECOVERY: 1 = touch "toque to sky" tall body position and look forward with head up and hips forward (not head down and hips back); 2 = "step forward" with recovery foot toward opposite ski tip; 3 = land on "outside edge" of ski; 4 = land your recovery ski forward like an "airplane" landing (not put it down on in the track behind you); 5 = glide with weight on your "baby toe" side of ski for a flat ski; 6 = "bellybutton follows" recovery ski tip forward to keep hips forward during glide; 7 open bellybutton body tall; 8 = "collapse" ankles to "bounce" your body weight like a beach ball; 9 = "ssswwwiiinnnggg" elbows forward off of kicking foot to add power to your kick; POWER: 10 = "crunch" poles to break pole straps with upper body crunch; 11 = "karate kick" down and kick perpendicular 90 degrees to the side; 12 = follow through behind with giant arm swing (but remember that you are moving your bellybutton forward in the opposite direction of the arm swing); 13 = timing is "One-Two," with One being your kick with one leg and Two being both of your poles and kick with the other leg.
One Skate Technique Key Words: 1 = create more power from the upper body crunch compared to two skate;  2 = open bellybutton forward; 3 = "crunch" poles down to try to break pole straps by crunching abdominal muscles; 3 = powerful upper body "poling platform" with elbows elbows bent at 90 degrees during crunch; 4 = "crunch-curl" your upper body like a cat; 5 = short poling action with hands stopping beside legs (don't follow through with arms like two skate); 6 = short "quick karate kick" action; 7 = timing is "pole-kick."
Uphill Offset Technique Key Words: 1 = keep weight on "toes" with hips forward up the hill; 2 = timing is both "poles and feet contact" the snow at the same micro-milli second as your recovery foot; 3 = "answer telephone" with upper hand; 4 = move head side to side; 4 = "quick and light" short step up up the hill; 5 = "push knees" toward ski tips for glide; 6 = reach upper elbow forward and platform pole with both arms using a short "abdominal crunch" against pole straps; 7 = "equal kick" with both legs to the side; 8 = spend 66.66% percent of your time working on your non-favourite side; 9 = "switch sides" half-way up each hill with a "quick-pole-pole" transition.
Finish each workout with 15 minutes of poling strength training, by alternating techniques between double poling up gentle hills or into the wind; and one arm poling on the flats or with the wind, changing techniques from one arm poling before your arms completely fatigue.
One Arm Poling Key Words: 1 = "ski tall" to touch head to sky; 2 = "rotate-twist shoulders" to reach forward with elbows; 3 = open bellybutton forward; 4 = "crunch" abs to break pole straps with your abs; 5 = rotate-twist shoulders to "elbow the person behind you;" 6 = one arm pole with "whole upper body" and not just your arms.

DOWNHILL CORNER AND STEP TURN KEY WORDS: 
Tuck Key Words: 1 = "breathe and relax" leg muscles; 2 keep weight on "balls of feet;" 3 = drop body "weight low" to the ground; 4 = bend "back flat parallel" to ground; 5 = hands together in front of you.
Downhill Corner Turn Key Words: 1 = "breathe and relax" all muscles; 2 = keep weight on "balls of  feet;" 3 = drop body "weight low" to the ground; 4 = choose the "best line" by swinging wide to the outside of the turn; 5 = "wave arms" out to the side like wings on a bird for counter balance; 6 = start five "quick steps" with inside foot before turning; 7 = "lead turn with your eyes" looking at the path you want your skis to follow; 8 = lead turn with "inside hand" moving forward; 9 = lead turn with "inside foot" stepping forward about a half ski boot length; 10 = take "quick tiny popcorn steps" while going around the corner; 11 = keep your "feet moving quick until you complete your turn";" 12 = "breathe and relax" when going straight again.
Step Turn Key Words: 0 = used on flat terrain to accelerate around a corner; 2 = "lead turn with your eyes" looking at the path you want your skis to follow; 3 = reach forward with both elbows with a double-poling swing; 4 = at the same time "step forward" to lead the turn with your outside foot; 5 = both poles and your outside foot "contact" the snow at the very same time; 6 = powerful "crunch pole and karate kick" at the same time to push body around the corner; 7 = sharp fast corner use "quick kick-pole;" 8 = long slow corner use more "powerful kick-pole."

Thursday, July 19

Vikings Team Information

Howdy Cross Country Skiers, Biathletes, Cross Country Runners, Triathletes, and anyone who wants to join our Vikings Team!

My name is Les Parsons. I am a cross country ski coach of our Camrose Ski Club Vikings, and, University of Alberta - Augustana Vikings. I also coach running and triathlon, and, help coach biathlon.

We welcome you to be a part of our Vikings Team! IF you have never cross country skied before, but want to try our sport, we invite you to join our Vikings Team. IF you have friends who are interested in xc skiing, connect them to this blog.

Communications: This blog is my only communication tool to share my coaching information. 

The best way to communicate with me is in person = face to face, immediately after any practice.

Email: AFTER you have read the information on this blog, IF you have any questions, OR, you need me to add any changes to clarify & confirm information details, or correct any mistakes, email me your questions les.parsons@ualberta.ca  

PHONE: ONLY IF your question is urgent, phone me or text me: 780-691-6912 YOU can phone me 7 days a week between 6am-9pm, but, NOT after 9pm unless it is an emergency. IF I am too busy to answer your phone call, please leave a message with your phone number and the best times for me to call you back. If you don't have long-distance calling, leave me a message, and, I can call you on my free phone plan. 

PLEASE check this blog every morning to confirm any changes we make to our daily and weekly organization. It is your responsibility to keep informed of team details. To speed up your blog reading time, simply look for the red text below of Date and Time and Who.

OFFICE: My office is located in Camrose, at the Augustana Campus of the University of Alberta, in the Faith and Life Center, in the gymnasium.

Tim Wintoniw = Vikings Cross Country Ski Team Head Coach
tim.wintoniw@ualberta.ca   cell 780-281-2727

Lowell Niven = Vikings Biathlon Team Head Coach
lowellniven@hotmail.com   cell 780-679-6350 

Gerhard Lotz = Vikings Cross Country Running Coach
glotz@uaberta.ca  office 780-679-1521

New Athletes interested in joining our Vikings Cross Country Ski Team, Biathlon Team, Cross Country Running Team, or Triathlon Team! We welcome you new athletes to join our teams. Invite friends who are athletes from the following endurance sports: xc running, track distance running, road running, triathlon, road biking, mountain biking, swimming, soccer, rowing, hockey, ringette, basketball, volleyball or any other aerobic sports. We are offering a program to train new athletes to become cross country ski athletes. We will have special practices to introduce new skiers to train for our sport. Any athletes interested in learning to xc ski and to train with our teams, please email your name, email address and phone number to les.parsons@ualberta.ca 

Augustana Vikings Athletes and Camrose Ski Club High School Athletes = Academics First! Our xc ski team won the Team Academic Award last season, with the highest Grade Point Average of all of our Augustana Vikings Teams. As student athletes, academics is our #1 priority for each and every athlete on our team. We will do all that we can to minimize conflicts between academics and athletics, so that you have a balanced lifestyle as competitive student athletes.

CAMROSE SKI CLUB: Our Augustana Vikings xc ski team, biathlon team, xc running team and triathlon team work together cooperatively in a positive relationship with our Camrose Ski Club Vikings teams. We share our coaching resources, our great volunteer leaders, and our great network of skiing-running trails and biathlon range facilities. 

COST$: We do our very best to keep our Vikings athletes costs as affordable as possible, so that any athlete or family can afford to train and compete with our team.

Fundraising: HELP! IF you have any ideas to raise funds for our team, please talk to me!

Yeee Haaa!  Les  780-691-6912

Tuesday, April 24

Race Preparation and Race Evaluation


CROSS COUNTRY RUN OR SKI RACE PREPARATION

Our competitive skiers are expected to take personal responsibility for your race preparation. We want you to learn to be independent from your parents and coaches. We encourage you to copy and print this race preparation document. Use it at home and bring it with you to share with our coaches at our practices and race competitions.
For our elite athletes, we challenge you to improve your race preparation by responding to steps A, B and C below.
A: Choose 3 objectives from the list below that you decide you need to improve for your next race. IF you don't take the time to identify 3 objectives, then you will not be able to improve your race preparation.
B: Two or three days before your race, explain to your coaches your 3 race preparation objectives.
C: After each race, evaluate what you learned from your race, and, discuss your 3 objectives with our coaches, to make changes to your race preparation for your next race. We ask you to pay close attention to little details, because each little detail is very important.



Most important, it is your responsibility to develop your personal race preparation system. For our race competitions, our coaches will focus our attention on the athletes who make the effort to improve their race preparation.



Many people have asked me how Beckie Scott and Alex Harvey prepare to race. My response is simple…they live the elite athlete lifestyle with a healthy personal balance of self-family-friends-school-other interests; they train 5 or 6 days a week for many years; and, they focus their attention to prepare to compete. They are able to race 2 demanding competitions on a weekend, because they prepare themselves to race each day. After 20 years of coaching athletes, I have developed a list of actions that an elite athlete can use to develop their personal race preparation routine. These are the things that Beckie and Alex do before every training practice and every race they compete in: intervals, time trials, regional races, provincial races, national races and international races.

1: The day before your race, train easy in zone 1 for 20 minutes (midgets-juveniles); 30 minutes (juniors); or 40 minutes (seniors-masters). The best training is classic skiing or jogging on easy flat trails with no steep uphill climbs, because if you train on steep uphill climbs, you will create muscle fatigue and waste energy that you want to conserve for your race the next day.

2: Eat an elite athlete’s supper, with lots of good proteins and carbohydrates, to build up your body energy reserves for your race the next day. After you wash the dishes, go for a 15 minute walk to aid your digestion. In your training journal, write down exactly what you ate for supper, until you find your best “pre-race meal” for yourself.

3: Prepare your 2 or 3 lunch bags for tomorrow. Bag #1 = “finish line recovery nutrition” (see #19 below). Bag #2 = “after cool down recovery nutrition” (see #22). Bag #3 = “travel home meal” (see #26) because sometimes we will not be stopping to eat a meal while driving home. Put your 3 bags in the refrigerator for the next morning.

4: Prepare both pairs of your skis for tomorrow = your warm up skis and racing skis. Glide wax and scrape your skis with the race waxes that our coaches suggest. Clean your kick zone and prepare your kick zone with sandpaper.

5: Prepare 3 changes of clothing. One change for travel and your race warm-up; one change for immediately after your race; and one change (plus a towel if there is a shower at the ski centre) before for your ride home. Always bring extra clothing and extra gloves-mitts-toques-biffs-neck warmers for rain, wind, very cold weather, warm weather. Pack all of your clothes in a bag for the next morning.

6: Go to sleep early, to get 8 to 10 hours of sleep. Before you go to bed, follow your pre-sleep routine so that you are relaxed: a 15 minute fresh air walk, or, 15 minutes of easy stretching, or, a bath-shower to relax. Go to bed happy with positive thoughts for happy dreams.

7: Before breakfast, dress warm to go outside for 15 minutes of fresh air. Walk for 15 minutes, or, walk for 5 minutes and jog slowly for 10 minutes. IF you are staying at high altitude, do not jog, just walk, to keep your heart rate low.

8: Eat an elite athlete’s breakfast at least 2.5 hours before your race start time. Start your breakfast with one or two eggs, while you are cooking your oatmeal. Your second choice for excellent digestible protein before a race is a cup of cottage cheese. Cook slow cooking 15-20 minute large flake oatmeal is the best complex carbohydrates for racing. Do not eat the instant oatmeal that comes in little paper packages, that you just add hot water to, because it does not contain complex carbohydrates nor energy, so it is as bad as the most of the non-athlete boxed cereals that line the grocery stores. If not oatmeal, cook your other favorite complex grain whole wheat cereal, but not high fibre nor high sugar cereal. It is important to over-cook your oatmeal or hot cereal with, to break down the fibre. And, use too much water to cook your hot cereal, so it is liquid smooth versus thick. For better flavour, throw your favourite dried or frozen fruits into your water before you start to heat it up: raisins, chopped dates, chopped apples, cranberries, blueberries, raspberries, etc and add cinnamon for flavour. Do not drink or use much milk = lactate acid. Yoghurt and molasses and (or a little bit of honey) are good to add to oatmeal. Or, 100% whole wheat bagels with molasses or honey, or, 100% whole wheat toast is OK. Do not eat bacon or fats (peanut butter) or meats or milk before races. Some older athletes like a cup of coffee or green tea a couple of hours before races, for caffeine-energy metabolism during the race. Do not eat 2 hours before your race, because your stomach will need the blood and energy to digest food at the same time your muscles need energy to race. In your training journal, write down exactly what you ate for breakfast, until you find your best “pre-race meal” for yourself. After breakfast, prepare a thermos of your favourite hot beverage or soup for after your race.

9: After you wash the dishes, organize your transportation to the race. Shovel the snow from your walkway and driveway parking garage, and, clean the snow off of your vehicle. Load all of your race preparation bags into your car. IF you do not have to shovel snow, go for a 15 minute walk to aid your digestion.

10: Drink lots of water or your favourite herbal tea during the morning of your race, and, sip on your room temperature water bottle while you are driving to the race.

11: Arrive at the race centre one hour (or one and a half hours) before your race start, so that you have time to register for your race; pick up your bib; ask about changes to your race course (your start time, the entry & exit of the start-finish stadium, which race trail, which colour of flags to follow, number of kilometres, number of laps-loops, start line order and finish line directions, warm up trail location). The extra half hour will give you a chance to say hi to your team-mates and friends.

12: Find our “team place” at the ski centre, to find a quiet relaxing place to rest. Find a chair or some floor space to sit down, so that you are NOT standing for 1 or 2 hours before your race, to save your legs for the race. Leave your bags here; prepare your after-race food bag and your after-race change of dry clothing bag, and, look for all of the toilets and change rooms. Put your ski bag in our “team place” waxing room, and, organize your warm up and race skis with our coaches. Ask the coaches to suggest a good kick wax for your warm up skis, and, kick wax your warm up skis by yourself.

13: IF you did not have the chance to familiarize yourself with your race trail the days before the race, arrive two hours before your race, so that you have time to walk or ski your race trail before the race trails are closed for the competition. Be selfish and go by yourself, so that other people do not interfere with your race course memorization. As you leave the start line, push your nose button to record your mental video cassette to memorize all of the details of your race course. Think about your personal individual race course strategy while you are memorizing the course. Walk or ski really slowly, to save your energy for your race. “Whoever skis the course familiarization the fastest…loses the race, and, whoever skis the course familiarization the slowest…wins the race.” Walk or ski the steep uphill climbs very slowly, to save your energy for your race.

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14: WARM UP ROUTINE FOR A FREESTYLE TECHNIQUE SKATE RACE:
*40-35-30 minutes before your race start, take a good drink of water, take a pee, dress to ski, put your race bib around your neck; find your skis and start your wrist watch time at 40-35-30 minutes, and, begin your warm up.

Seniors/Elites x 40 minutes: athletes who train 11+ hours/week or 500+ hours/year.
Juniors/Experienced x 35 minutes: athletes who train 7-10 hours/week or 350-500 hours/year.
Juveniles/Youth x 30 minutes: athletes who train 4-6 hours/week or 200-350 hours/year.
Minutes before start time:
40 minutes (seniors): ski zone 1 for 20 minutes; ski slow up the hills.
35 minutes (juniors): ski zone 1 for 15 minutes; ski slow up the hills.
30 minutes (juveniles): ski zone 1 for 10 minutes; ski slow up the hills.
20 minutes : ski 3 minutes zone 2 x 66% race pace effort.
17 minutes : ski 3 minutes zone 3 x 90% race pace effort.
14 minutes: go to the wax room or the stadium; exchange your warm up skis for race skis, take a sip of water; take a pee; mark your skis; remove warm up clothing; put on race bib.
10 minutes: during the last few minutes before your race, never stop moving. Move continually on your feet or on your skis. Ski or Run inside the stadium, close to the start line, where you can see the race bib numbers of the athletes in the start line in front of you, and, where you can hear the race officials calling race bib numbers and race categories.
*repeat 5 accelerations of running or skiing at 100% race pace tempo for 5 seconds and then ski slow or jog-walk for 55 seconds.
*while you are lined up in the start line, keep your legs and arms moving.
*arrive at the start line: body warm and ready to race; with a medium pulse of 120-150/minute; and a big smile of confidence that you are ready to race
0 minutes: START YOUR RACE WITH A BIG SMILE. During your race, focus your thoughts on your favourite key words for tempo and technique.
*start your race with a big smile and “quick relaxed tempo”.
*key words: smile; think 100% positive; “YES!”; quick and light; relax; breath; focus perfect technique; fast tempo; “FUN!”; fluid technique; push the flats; “GO!”; attack the hills in control; push over the top of the hills; push my limit; PLUS your favourite 3 key words that motivate you!
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14: WARM UP ROUTINE FOR A CLASSIC TECHNIQUE RACE: (we have added 10 minutes to give athletes-coaches time to change kick wax during warm up)

*50-45-40 minutes before your race start, take a good drink of water, take a pee, dress to ski, put your race bib around your neck; find your skis and start your wrist watch time at 50-45-40 minutes, and, begin your warm up

Seniors/Elites x 50 minutes: athletes who train 11+ hours/week or 500+ hours/year.
Juniors/Experienced x 45 minutes: athletes who train 7-10 hours/week or 350-500 hours/year.
Juveniles/Youth x 30 minutes: athletes who train 4-6 hours/week or 200-350 hours/year.
Minutes before start time:
50 minutes (seniors): ski zone 1 for 30 minutes; ski slow up the hills; test your kick wax.
45 minutes (juniors): ski zone 1 for 25 minutes; ski slow up the hills; test your kick wax.
40 minutes (juveniles): ski zone 1 for 20 minutes; ski slow up the hills; test your kick wax.
20 minutes: ski 3 minutes zone 2 x 66% race pace effort.
17 minutes: ski 3 minutes zone 3 x 90% race pace effort.
14 minutes: go to the wax room or the stadium; exchange your warm up skis for race skis OR give your warm up - race skis to our stadium coaches for kick wax finish; take a sip of water; take a pee; mark your skis; remove warm up clothing; put on race bib.
10 minutes: during the last few minutes before your race, never stop moving. Move continually on your feet or on your skis. Ski or Run inside the stadium, close to the start line, where you can see the race bib numbers of the athletes in the start line in front of you, and, where you can hear the race officials calling race bib numbers and race categories.
*repeat 5 accelerations of running or skiing at 100% race pace tempo for 5 seconds and then ski slow or jog-walk for 55 seconds.

*while you are lined up in the start line, keep your legs and arms moving.

*arrive at the start line: body warm and ready to race; with a medium pulse of 120-150/minute; and a big smile of confidence that you are ready to race

0 minutes: START YOUR RACE WITH A BIG SMILE. During your race, focus your thoughts on your favourite key words for tempo and technique.

*start your race with a big smile and “fast-quick relaxed tempo” over the top of the first big climb, and then “GO HARD!”

*key words: smile; think 100% positive; “YES!”; quick and light; relax; breath; focus perfect technique; fast tempo; “FUN!”; fluid technique; push the flats; “GO!”; attack the hills in control; push over the top of the hills; push my limit; PLUS your favourite 3 key words that motivate you!

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15: After second last big climb; for the last 1 or 2 kilometres; challenge yourself to maximum tempo to the finish = push your limit to attack the flats; attack the last big climb with your “physiological finish line” over the top of the hill; sprint over the top of the last big hill and sprint-attack the last 1 kilometre to the stadium finish line.



16: Finish Line: “the finish line of this race = the start line for your next race.” As soon as you cross the finish line, your preparation immediately begins for your next race. Finish and start with POSITIVE THOUGHTS and a BIG SMILE!



17: Three seconds after you cross the finish line, ask yourself: “What is more tired, the muscles in my legs and arms, or, my breathing and cardio-vascular system?” “What kept me from racing faster, my muscles or my motor?” This information is really important for our coaches, to know what you need to concentrate on in your training: either more muscular short speed intervals of steep climbing and double poling sprints, or, more long aerobic hill cardiovascular intervals.



18: Ten seconds after you cross the finish line, give some encouragement to your competitors, while you take off your skis and pick up your warm up clothing. Put your skis at the start of the cool down trail. Before you start getting cold, immediately walk to the ski centre to our “team place” to immediately change into your dry clothes. Keep moving and do NOT sit down.


19: Three to five minutes after you cross the finish line, eat and drink your bag #1 “finish line recovery nutrition” = chocolate milk and your favourite healthy homemade squares or energy bars or cookies or cake or granola bar or your favourite healthy dry cereal or real fruit juice or yoghurt. After a race, your body immediately needs good nutrition to replenish the energy stores in your muscles, so that your body can recover from your race and prepare for your next race. Each 5 minute delay in your digestion of nutrition will add about 30 minutes to your energy recovery. For example, if you do not digest anything after your race for 30 minutes, you add 3 extra hours to your recovery time. No nutrition for one hour adds 6 extra hours to your recovery time.

20: After you drink and eat bag #1, fill up your water bottle and put some more snacks in your pockets, dress with dry warm clothes-toque-gloves to avoid getting sick from being wet & cold. Go for your cool down ski or jog. Drink as much water as you can each ten minutes during your cool down. Use a flat trail with no big hills for your 20 minutes cool down zone 1 ski or jog. Avoid skiing up steep hills during your cool down, and, slowly walk up any steep uphill climbs. Or, take your ski poles and walk with our 3 step double pole along the race trails, to encourage your team mates in their races. Eat & drink as much as you can while you are cheering.

21: During your cool down, evaluate your race. Start with your race preparation; warm up; race strategy; race psychology. Give yourself a percentage score out of 100% for your race effort. You must evaluate your race before you know your race result! Your evaluation of your race and your personal best effort are much more important than your race result!

22: Return to our “team place” in the ski centre to drink and eat your bag #2 “after cool down recovery nutrition.” Eat a good variety of healthy proteins and carbohydrates: boiled egg; 100% whole wheat sandwich with eggs or tuna or salmon or beef; peanut butter; cheese; humus; apple; orange; banana; raisons; dates; figs; nuts; carrots; tomatoes; yoghurt; more healthy homemade squares or energy bars; granola bars; real fruit juice; and DARK CHOCOLATE! Bring a thermos of hot beverage soup or herbal tea or hot chocolate.
23: While you eat, take five minutes to write down your race evaluation in your journal, and, write down the things you want to change for your next race. Do this before you see your results, because your evaluation of your performance is more important than your result. You need to focus on your feelings and your thoughts about your effort in your race.

24: Before or after you eat and you do your race evaluation, clean your skis and travel wax them for the journey home. Before the medals are presented, pack all of your bags and skis and load them into your vehicle.

25: At the medal presentations…IF the medals are presented outside, you MUST wear warm layers of ski clothing, with warm boots and toques and mitts! Please respect the medal presenters and listen to them, and, cheer for competitors from all clubs.

26: After the medals, IF there is a shower in the ski centre, it is ideal to have a hot-cold-hot-cold shower to help your muscles recover. Always bring a towel to every ski race.

27: During your return trip home, drink and eat bag #3, your “travel home meal.” If your drive home is longer than one hour, stop each hour for 5 minutes to skip walk and swing your arms for 4 minutes and twist-turn for 1 minute.

28: When you arrive home, unload your vehicle and clean up your stuff. Make a snack and hot drink. Then have a hot-cold-hot-cold shower or bath.

29: Before supper, go for a 15 minute arm swinging walk to help with your recovery. Eat an elite athlete’s supper, with lots of calories and carbohydrates, to rebuild your body energy reserves for your race the next day. After you wash the dishes, go for a 15 minute arm swinging walk to aid your digestion.

30: Dream about your next race…start your next race preparation with your dream.

Sweat Dreams!!! Les
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Race Evaluation: share your race evaluation from your training journal with your training group coaches this week, to help yourself prepare for your next race. Each competition is your opportunity to learn from your race experience. What did you learn? What went well? What do you need to improve?

Our coaching team asks each of you athletes to take personal responsibility for your own personal race preparation. We want you to learn to be independent in your race preparation, and not dependent on your parents and coaches. After each race, evaluate what you learned from your race, and, discuss your 3 objectives with your coaches, to make changes to your race preparation for your next race. We ask you to pay close attention to little details, because each little detail is very important. Most important, it is your responsibility to develop your own individual personal race preparation system and routine. For all of our race competitions, our coaches will provide feedback to the athletes who make the effort to improve their race preparation.

Write down your race evaluation in the back of your training journal; evaluate your race, start with your race preparation; warm up; race strategy; race psychology; give yourself a percentage score out of 100% for two things = your race preparation, and, your race effort; answer THE question (Question = 3 seconds after you arrive at the finish line, demand of yourself: “What was more tired, my leg muscles, or, my lungs-breathing-aerobic-cardio-vascular?”...this information is really important for your coaches, to make changes to your training program to add more short speed sprint intervals or leg strength running up hills, OR, to add more long zone 3 intervals, OR, to add more long distance zone 1 aerobic distance running); write down the three most important things you want to change for your next race; AND, share this with your coaches.

NOTE: If you would like a copy of our race preparation document, please email me to ask me to email you a copy:lesparsonsgreen@yahoo.ca




Monday, September 19

Training Programs




TRAINING PROGRAMS:
*Print off two copies of our 2012-2013 Calendar of Events = one for you and one for me
*Mark a rank order number from #1 to #4 beside the events for yourself to achieve your goals: #1 = MOST important priority events for my season goal...you can pick two or three including running; #2 = very important events I NEED to do; #3 = important events I WANT to do; #4 = EXTRA events I might do if it fits into my schedule
*Take one hour to design your own personal training program broken up at different times of the day = 30 minutes first draft; 15 minutes second draft; 15 minutes third draft = an important exercise for you to learn how to coach yourself. Do it yourself! Only use your own thoughts based on your own experience as an athlete. Don't ask other athletes. Don't waste time looking up any coaching resources. Don't look at a training plan you may already have. Use an old paper calendar or draw a seven month September to March calendar on scrap paper. Write out your training plan by hand, so we can discuss it together and write notes on it. We will making changes to it every week all year, so don't worry about specific details. I will give you ONE word of advice = start by writing in the dates of your races and then plan your training program backwards from those dates. Keep it short and simple. Use point form abbreviated short words or symbols like: hrs = hours; min = minutes; sec = seconds; int = intervals; Z = zone; work/rest; str = strength; invent your own symbols that work for you; example below:
Mon Nov 19: rest day 
Tue Nov 20: 90 min combos 8 int 2minZ3/2minZ1
Wed Nov 21: 45min AM str /// 90 min PM ski Z1 
Thu Nov 22: 90min combos 12 int 10secZ4/110secZ1
Fri Nov 23: 45 min race prep
Sat Nov 24: 90min race
Sun Nov 25: 90min race
Week = 7.5hrs

Tuesday, June 7

Waxing Kits

Vikings Team shopping list of the most important waxing stuff for skiers:


"Lester's Best-Bang-for-your-Buck" Basic Wax Kit: for new beginner youth & adult recreational skiers, and, Jackrabbits and Track Attackers. The tools will last for your lifetime as a skier. The kick waxes will last you about 5-8 years. The glide waxes will last you about 3-5 years. Buy an old used tool box to put all of your waxing stuff, and, print your first name or initials on all of your stuff with a permanent felt marker.
Basic Tools: Waxing Iron Swix Style T 75 = about $50 (or you can use the waxing irons at our ski club), glide wax scraper to scrape and remove glide wax...buy a thick one you can't bend = about $5, pencil scraper to clean the groove in the middle of the ski = about $3, synthetic cork to apply and smooth kick wax = about $5, small bottle of kick wax remover = about $15, 100 grit sandpaper...3 sheets = about $2.
Six Swix Kick Waxes and Klister: V20Green, V30Blue, V40Blue Extra, V50Violet, V60Red/Silver, each kick wax costs about $8, K22N Universal Klister = $10.
Four Swix Glide Waxes: CH4Green, CH6Blue, CH7Violet = each small glide wax package costs about $30.

"Lester's Big-Bang-for-your-Buck"Athlete Wax Kit: for competitive athletes to prepare skis for training and to prepare skis with base waxes for competition:
Waxing Tools: waxing bench, ski holder vice, waxing iron Swix Style T 74, thick glide wax scrapers, groove scraper, glide wax square steel brush Swix T0179B, sandpaper 80 grit and 100 grit, kick wax corks, heat gun for base wax and klister, klister brush, cloth blue shop cloth towel, wax remover.
Six Training Swix Kick Waxes = V20Green (can used a a binder),V30Blue, V40Blue Extra, V50Violet, V60Red/Silver, K22N Universl Klister.
Five Competition Swix Kick Waxes: Base Binder Green, VR40Blue, VR50Violet, VR60Silver, VR70Red.
Four Training Swix Glide Waxes: CH4Green, CH6Blue, CH7Violet, CH8Red.
Four Competition Swix Glide Waxes: LF4Green, LF6Blue, LF7Violet, LF8Red.